Grade 6: Analyzing Structure and Communicating Theme in Literature – IF by Rudyard Kipling and BUD, NOT BUDDY

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http://www.engageny.org/sites/default/files/resource/attachments/6m2a.2.pdf  Grade 6: Module 2A Unit 2

COMMON CORE STANDARDS

Reading Literature

RL.6.1 Cite textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text.

RL.6.2 Determine a theme or central idea of a text and how it is conveyed through particular details; provide a summary of the text distinct from personal opinions or judgments.

RL.6.3 Describe how a particular story’s or drama’s plot unfolds in a series of episodes as well as how the characters respond or change as the plot moves toward a resolution.

RL.6.4 Determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in a text, including figurative and connotative meanings; analyze the impact of a specific word choice on meaning and tone

RL.6.5 Analyze how a particular sentence, chapter, scene, or stanza fits into the overall structure of a text and contributes to the development of the theme, setting, or plot.

RL.6.7 Compare and contrast the experience of reading a story, drama, or poem to listening to or viewing an audio, video, or live version of the text, including contrasting what they “see” and “hear” when reading the text to what they perceive when they listen or watch.

RL.6.9 Compare and contrast texts in different forms or genres (e.g., stories and poems; historical novels and fantasy stories) in terms of their approaches to similar themes and topics.  

Reading Informational Text

RI.6.1 Cite textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text.

RI.6.2 Determine a theme or central idea of a text and how it is conveyed through particular details; provide a summary of the text distinct from personal opinions or judgments.

Writing

W.6.1 Write arguments to support claims with clear reasons and relevant evidence.

W.6.4 Produce clear and coherent writing in which the development, organization, and style are appropriate to task, purpose, and audience.

W.6.5 With some guidance and support from peers and adults, develop and strengthen writing as needed by planning, revising, editing, rewriting, or trying a new approach.

W.6.7 Conduct short research projects to answer a question, drawing on several sources and refocusing the inquiry when appropriate.

W.6.9 Draw evidence from literary or informational texts to support analysis, reflection, and research.

Speaking and Listening

SL.6.1(c) Pose and respond to specific questions with elaboration and detail by making comments that contribute to the topic, text, or issue under discussion.

SL.6.1(d) Review the key ideas expressed and demonstrate understanding of multiple perspectives through reflection and paraphrasing.

Language

L.6.1 Demonstrate command of the conventions of standard English grammar and usage when writing or speaking.

L.6.2 Demonstrate command of the conventions of standard English capitalization, punctuation, and spelling when writing.

L.6.5 Demonstrate understanding of figurative language, word relationships, and nuances in word meanings.

L.6.6 Acquire and use accurately grade-appropriate general academic and domain-specific words and phrases; gather vocabulary knowledge when considering a word or phrase important to comprehension or expression.

DESCRIPTION OF UNIT

This Grade 6 unit titled “Analyzing Structure and Communicating Theme in Literature: IF by Rudyard Kipling and BUD, NOT BUDDY”  developed by Expeditionary Learning for engageny.org is intended to be completed in approximately 17 one-hour sessions of language arts instruction.  Students analyze how individual stanzas contribute to a poem’s overall meaning. They also compare and contrast approaches to theme between a poem and a novel as they prepare to independently write a literary argument essay in which they establish a claim and substantiate it using specific text evidence.

CAUTIONS

Connecticut teachers should be aware that while the curriculum is available at the site listed, access to materials used in lessons may be limited. Teachers are cautioned that this unit builds on the instruction and the reading of part of a novel from the previous unit in this module.

RATIONALE FOR SELECTION

The unit is exemplary because it makes reading texts closely, examining textual evidence, and discerning deep meaning a central focus of instruction.  It also includes a progression of academic vocabulary instruction where skills advance and deepen over time. Students are provided with multiple opportunities to engage with texts of appropriate complexity, scaffolding, and other supports that build toward independence. The unit routinely expects that students draw evidence from texts to produce clear and coherent writing that informs, explains, or makes an argument in various written forms.  The formative and summative assessments include aligned rubrics that provide clear guidance for interpreting student performance. The following link illustrates how a teacher differentiates/scaffolds instruction to instruct ELL students experiencing writing.

Teaching Channel video for The Writing Recipe: Essay Structure for ELL (Teaching Channel) Eighth grade ELL students work with Dorina Sackman at Westridge Middle School in an activity to make sense of the pattern of writing a five paragraph essay.