Grades 9-12: Baseball, Race and Ethnicity – Rounding the Bases

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http://www.loc.gov/teachers/classroommaterials/lessons/bases/preparation.html

COMMON CORE STANDARDS   **Choose either the 9-10 or the 11-12 standards**

Grades 9-10

Reading Informational Text

RI.9-10.1 Cite strong and thorough textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text.

RI.9-10.2 Determine a central idea of a text and analyze its development over the course of the text, including how it emerges and is shaped and refined by specific details; provide an objective summary of the text.

RI.9-10.9 Analyze seminal U.S. documents of historical and literary significance  (e.g., Washington’s Farewell Address, the Gettysburg Address, Roosevelt’s Four Freedoms speech, King’s “Letter from Birmingham Jail”), including how they address related themes and concepts.

Writing

W.9-10.4 Produce clear and coherent writing in which the development, organization, and style are appropriate to task, purpose, and audience.

W.9-10.7 Conduct short as well as more sustained research projects to answer a question (including a self-generated question) or solve a problem; narrow or broaden the inquiry when appropriate; synthesize multiple sources on the subject, demonstrating understanding of the subject under investigation.

W.9-10.8 Gather relevant information from multiple authoritative print and digital sources, using advanced searches effectively; assess the usefulness of each source in answering the research question; integrate information into the text selectively to maintain the flow of ideas, avoiding plagiarism and following a standard format for citation.

W.9-10.10 Write routinely over extended time frames (time for research, reflection, and revision) and shorter time frames (a single sitting or a day or two) for a range of tasks, purposes, and audiences.

Speaking and Listening

SL.9-10.1 Initiate and participate effectively in a range of collaborative discussions (one-on-one, in groups, and teacher-led) with diverse partners on grades 9-10 topics, texts, and issues, building on others’ ideas and expressing their own clearly and persuasively.

SL.9-10.1 (a) Come to discussions prepared, having read and researched material under study; explicitly draw on that preparation by referring to evidence from texts and other research on the topic or issue to stimulate a thoughtful, well-reasoned exchange of ideas.

SL.9-10.1 (c) Propel conversations by posing and responding to questions that relate the current discussion to broader themes or larger ideas; actively incorporate others into the discussion; and clarify, verify, or challenge ideas and conclusions.

SL.9-10.1 (d) Respond thoughtfully to diverse perspectives, summarize points of agreement and disagreement, and, when warranted, qualify or justify their own views and understanding and make new connections in light of the evidence and reasoning presented.

Grades 11-12

Reading for Information

RI.11-12.1 Cite strong and thorough textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text, including determining where the text leaves matters uncertain.

RI.11.12.2 Determine two or more central ideas of a text and analyze their development over the course of the text, including how they interact and build on one another to provide a complex analysis; provide an objective summary of the text

RI.11-12.9 Analyze seventeenth-, eighteenth-, and nineteenth-century foundational U.S. documents of historical and literary significance (including The Declaration of Independence, the Preamble to the Constitution, the Bill of Rights, and Lincoln’s Second Inaugural Address) for their themes, purposes, and rhetorical features.

Writing

W.11-12.4 Produce clear and coherent writing in which the development, organization, and style are appropriate to task, purpose, and audience.

W.11-12.7 Conduct short as well as more sustained research projects to answer a question (including a self-generated question) or solve a problem; narrow or broaden the inquiry when appropriate; synthesize multiple sources on the subject, demonstrating understanding of the subject under investigation.

W.11-12.8 Gather relevant information from multiple authoritative print and digital sources, using advanced searches effectively; assess the strengths and limitations of each source in terms of the task, purpose, and audience; integrate information into the text selectively to maintain the flow of ideas, avoiding plagiarism and overreliance on any one source and following a standard format for citation.

W.11-12.10 Write routinely over extended time frames (time for research, reflection, and revision) and shorter time frames (a single sitting or a day or two) for a range of tasks, purposes, and audiences.

Speaking and Listening

SL.11-12.1 Initiate and participate effectively in a range of collaborative discussions (one-on-one, in groups, and teacher-led) with diverse partners on grades 11-12 topics, texts, and issues, building on others’ ideas and expressing their own clearly and persuasively.

SL.11-12.1 (a) Come to discussions prepared, having read and researched material under study; explicitly draw on that preparation by referring to evidence from texts and other research on the topic or issue to stimulate a thoughtful, well-reasoned exchange of ideas.

SL.11-12.1 (c) Propel conversations by posing and responding to questions that probe reasoning and evidence; ensure a hearing for a full range of positions on a topic or issue; clarify, verify, or challenge ideas and conclusions; and promote divergent and creative perspectives.

SL.11-12.1 (d) Respond thoughtfully to diverse perspectives; synthesize comments, claims, and evidence made on all sides of an issue; resolve contradictions when possible; and determine what additional information or research is required to deepen the investigation or complete the task.

DESCRIPTION OF UNIT

This Grades 9-12 unit titled “Baseball, Race and Ethnicity: Rounding the Bases” by Jennifer Schwelik and Greg Deegan cited on the Library of Congress website is intended to be completed in five class periods of ELA/Literacy instruction. With observation, analysis, and evaluation of primary sources the focus of instruction, students use primary sources on to explore the American experience regarding race and ethnicity. Through lesson activities, students: analyze historical images, create an original argument, pose historical questions, employ search strategies to obtain primary historical data from targeted collections of sources, and place the developments of race and ethnicity in America in historical context. As a final activity, student groups create a newspaper page with both a visual image and a textual document from their time period, and an editorial analyzing how Americans’ ideas about race and ethnicity are illustrated in the group’s baseball sources.

CAUTIONS

Connecticut teachers are cautioned that to use teach this unit as intended, they must become familiar with how to navigate the Library of Congress website and the extensive materials offered. Although assessment guidelines for student participation, as well as for interim and final products are included, the use of a Common-Core-aligned rubric that elicits direct, observable evidence of the degree to which students can independently demonstrate all of the targeted standards is suggested. Additional supports and modifications for students who are ELL, have disabilities, or read well below the grade level text band may be necessary. Teachers of social studies who choose to use this unit should substitute the grade-level Literacy in History/Social Studies, Science, & Technical Subjects standards for those listed above. All students must have use of computers with connections to the Internet.

RATIONALE FOR SELECTION

This unit is a good example of a unit that provides for authentic learning, application of literacy skills, student-directed inquiry, analysis, evaluation and/or reflection. The use of technology and media deepens learning and draws attention to evidence and texts as appropriate. The unit activities cultivate student interest and engagement in reading, writing, and speaking about texts. Extension activities are included.